“F” Division Memorial 1873 – 1900

Sub Constable George MAHONEY – June 19, 1877

Much of the information that would normally be available on Cst. George MAHONEY was destroyed in the fire that damaged the West Block of the Parliament Buildings in 1897. However; we do know that George MAHONEY was formerly a farmer who joined the NWMP on the promise of receiving a government land grant of 160 acres upon completion of his service. He married Emma Ballendine in the spring of 1873 at St. Pauls, Selkirk County, Manitoba. He was engaged with the NWMP at Winnipeg on May 3, 1875. He and his wife moved into barracks at Battleford in 1876. He served slightly over two years with the Force before a fatal accident took his life.   Read More…

Cst. George Hamilton JOHNSTON – May 23, 1882

Cst. Johnston was born June 7, 1860 at Billings Gate, Ont. (Now Ottawa / Napean) where family home still stands.  He was brought up in a strong Presbyterian household.  Cst. JOHNSTON and a friend of his, Marmaduke GRABURN applied for the NWMP on April 3, 1879 in Ottawa.  They left Ottawa on June 9, 1879 and arrived Fort Walsh on July 4.  Training for JOHNSTON began immediately, and consisted of foot and mounted drill, rudimentary law and statute awareness and orientation to the surrounding terrain. Read More…

Cst. Thomas James GIBSON – March 26, 1885

Cst. GIBSON was born in 1860 and was a farmer prior to joining the NWMP at Fort Osborne/Winnipeg on March 11, 1884. He was posted to Battleford. By 1884, the strength of the NWMP force was raised to 557. When RIEL returned to Batoche from the US and further inflamed the Metis, the local white settlers began to run for safety to Prince Albert. Then the Metis ransacked the settlement of Duck Lake and drove out the white store owners. In response to that aggression, Supt. L.N.F. CROZIER led 57 NWM policemen, bolstered by some 43 Prince Albert volunteers, into Duck Lake. It was March 26, 1885. Read More…

Cst. George Pearce ARNOLD – March 27, 1885

Cst. ARNOLD was born on December 28, 1860 in Georgia, USA and had served as a scout in the US Cavalry. The papers that he left revealed that at one time, he owned cattle and horses in the Wyoming Territory he and his good friend Charles Ross (Reg. #1064) came to Canada and joined the Force in August 11, 1884 at Regina, Sask. His initial medical noted three previous bullet hole wounds. Read More…

Cst. George Knox GARRETT – March 27, 1885

Cst. GARRETT was from St. Helens, Cavan County, Cavan, Ireland, the son of a member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.   Unemployed and impoverished in Ireland, he wrote a letter to the Marquis of Lorne, Governor General of Canada, asking to be engaged in the NWMP. He explains his predicament. “… through stress of circumstances to seek employment in Canada and through no fault of ours we are here without money or means.” Read More…

Cst. David Latimer COWAN – April 15, 1885

Cst. COWAN was born in approximately1864. Originally from Ottawa, he joined the NWMP at Toronto, Ont. on April 4, 1882 and served at Battleford. He was a member of the Fort Pitt Detachment at the outbreak of the North-West Rebellion in 1885. There were to be more battles in the west of Canada after Duck Lake. On April 2, the Crees, under the war chief Wandering Spirit, massacred nine people at the small village of Frog Lake. When word of this atrocity reached Fort Pitt, the commander of the NWMP detachment, Insp. Francis J. DICKENS (son of the novelist Charles DICKENS) was greatly disturbed. Read More…

Cpl. Ralph Bateman SLEIGH – May 2, 1885

Cpl. SLEIGH was born in Bradburne, Darbyshire, England on July 14, 1858, the third son of John SLEIGH. A former farmer, he enlisted in the NWMP at Toronto and was engaged at Fort Walsh on June 7, 1881. He was promoted to Corporal on July 22, 1883. He was single and had been in the NWMP for four years. He served at Fort Macleod and in Charge of Frog Lake Detachment until it was withdrawn to Fort Pitt on March 31, 1885 just prior to the outbreak of the North West Rebellion. Read More…

Cst. Patrick BURKE – May 3, 1885

Cst. BURKE was born in approx. 1852. He married Sarah at Boniface, Manitoba on October 16, 1871.   He engaged Reg. # 353, as a sub constable and trumpeter in the NWMP on May 12, 1875 at Winnipeg, Manitoba. He was discharged as time expired on May 31, 1878. He re-engaged at the rank of Constable, Reg. #402 at Shoal Lake on September 1, 1879. Read More…

Cpl. William Hay Talbot LOWRY – May 3, 1885

Cpl. Talbot LOWRY from County Galway, Ireland was born on December 2, 1854. He served as a Captain in the Galway Militia. Cpl. LOWRY joined the NWMP on June 7, 1883 at Winnipeg, Manitoba. He was promoted to Corporal on February 18, 1884. He was not married and had been in the NWMP for two years. Read More…

Cst. Frank Orlando ELLIOTT – May 14, 1885

Cst. ELLIOTT was born in 1848. His father, D.T. Elliott was a minister in Troy, New York. On June 2, 1872, he married Mary Clapp in White Plains, New York, USA.   He was also a conductor with the Railroad. They had one daughter, Minnie on July 27, 1873. His wife passed away on October 31, 1873 and his daughter was left to be raised by his mother-in-law and maternal aunt, Mahala David (nee Clapp) at Picton, Ontario. He served as a Troop Sergeant Major in the 7th Regiment, United States Cavalry and was stationed at Fort Custer, Montana before enlisting with the NWMP. Read More…

Sgt. Albert Ernest Garland MONTGOMERY – August 10, 1890

Sgt. MONTGOMERY was born in 1862 and engaged in the NWMP on September 22, 1880 at Fort Walsh. He served at Fort MacLeod, Saskatoon and Prince Albert.

On Thursday, August 7, 1890, Sgt. MONTGOMERY had been leading his troop in mounted parade drill formations in an open field one and half miles away from the barracks. During the exercises, one of his men, Cst. Henri GRAVEL, was having trouble with a recalcitrant horse and MONTGOMERY stopped to help the new constable remount. Once GRAVEL was back in the saddle, Sgt. MONTGOMERY climbed back on his own horse and galloped off to rejoin the Division. Read More…

Sgt. Colin Campbell COLEBROOK – October 29, 1895

Sgt. COLEBROOK was born in London, England on February 28, 1862. He was employed as a junior clerk with London, Chatham & Dover Railway Locomotive Department, London and later with Junior Army & Navy Stores Ltd., London. He engaged in the NWMP on October 16, 1881 at Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan when he was 19. Sgt. COLEBROOK enjoyed a 15 year career with the NWMP serving at Prince Albert, Moosomin, Duck Lake and Batoche. He was promoted to Corporal on February 1, 1886 and Sergeant on February 1, 1887. At the time of Sgt. COLEBROOK’s death, he was receiving pay at the rate of one dollar per day. Read More…

Cst. Oscar Alexander KERN – April, 27, 1896

He was employed with the Deutsche Bank in London in 1883 prior to moving to British Columbia. At the age of 21 yrs. 9 months, Cst. KERN was engaged into the NWMP at Calgary, Alberta on September 10, 1894.

Cst. Oscar KERN drowned while fording Short Creek near Estevan, North-West Territories.

He had only served a little more than one and a half years with the Mounties before his fatal accident. KERN’s death was the seventh drowning in the 23 years since the inception of the Force. Read More…

Cst. John Randolph KERR – May 28, 1897

Cst. John KERR was Canadian born in approx. 1868 and had previously been a farmer from Barryvale, Renfrew County, in the Ottawa Valley. He also worked on a farm in Mallory, Minnesota. At the age of 26 years 1 month, he joined the NWMP on April 14, 1894 at Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Sgt. Colin COLEBROOK was the first of four men, three of them Mounties, to be killed over a span of 19 months by a Cree brave named Almighty Voice and his companions. Almighty Voice was a hot-blooded twenty year old who came from the One Arrow Reserve near Duck Lake in the North-West Territories. During his time, this man became Canada’s Public Enemy Number one. Read More…

Cpl. Charles Horne Sterling HOCKIN – May 29, 1897

Cpl. HOCKIN was born in England, the son of Admiral Hockin of Torquay. He spent

12 years in the Imperial Service, attaining the rank of Captain with the 44th Essex Regiment. He came to Canada, taking up residence in the MacLeod area. He joined the North-West Mounted Police at Fort Macleod on October 12, 1894 at 34 yrs. Of age. He served in Regina and Prince Albert.

He was appointed acting Cpl. On April 9, 1896 which was later confirmed. Sgt. Colin COLEBROOK was the first of four men, three of them Mounties, to be killed over a span of 19 months by a Cree brave named Almighty Voice and his companions. Read More…